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dc.contributor.authorTomasella, L.
dc.contributor.authorCappellaro, E.
dc.contributor.authorPumo, M.L.
dc.contributor.authorJerkstrand, A.
dc.contributor.authorBenetti, S.
dc.contributor.authorElias-Rosa, N.
dc.contributor.authorFraser, M.
dc.contributor.authorInserra, C.
dc.contributor.authorPastorello, A.
dc.contributor.authorTuratto, M.
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, J.P.
dc.contributor.authorGalbany, L.
dc.contributor.authorGutiérrez, C.P.
dc.contributor.authorKankare, E.
dc.contributor.authorPignata, G.
dc.contributor.authorTerreran, G.
dc.contributor.authorValenti, S.
dc.contributor.authorBarbarino, C.
dc.contributor.authorBauer, F.E.
dc.contributor.authorBotticella, M.T.
dc.contributor.authorChen, T.-W.
dc.contributor.authorGal-Yam, A.
dc.contributor.authorHarutyunyan, A.
dc.contributor.authorHowell, D.A.
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, K.
dc.contributor.authorGaroffolo, A.M.
dc.contributor.authorOchner, P.
dc.contributor.authorSmartt, S.J.
dc.contributor.authorSchulze, S.
dc.contributor.authorYoung, D.R.
dc.contributor.authorZampieri, L.
dc.date.accessioned2019-04-23T14:28:12Z
dc.date.available2019-04-23T14:28:12Z
dc.date.issued2018-04
dc.identifier.citationMonthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, 475(2), pp. 1937-1959.es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0035-8711
dc.identifier.otherDOI: 10.1093/mnras/stx3220
dc.identifier.urihttp://repositorio.unab.cl/xmlui/handle/ria/8573
dc.descriptionIndexación: Scopus.es_ES
dc.descriptionThis paper is also based on observations collected at the Coper-nico 1.82 m and Schmidt 67/92 Telescopes operated by INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova at Asiago, Italy; the Galileo 1.22 m Telescope operated by Department of Physics and Astronomy of the University of Padova at Asiago, Italy; the Nordic Optical Telescope, operated by the Nordic Optical Telescope Scientific Association at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos, La Palma, Spain, of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias; the Liverpool Telescope operated on the island of La Palma, Spain, by Liverpool John Moores University in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias with financial support from the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council; the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), installed in the Spanish Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos in the island of La Palma of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Spain; the 3.6 m Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated by the Fun-dación Galileo Galilei – INAF on the island of La Palma, Spain; the Las Cumbres Observatories (LCO) global network;10 the NTT 3.6 m, Trappist and REM Telescopes operated by European Southern Observatory (ESO) in Chile; the SMARTS and Prompt Telescopes operated by Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile; the Australian National University 2.3 m telescope (ANU) at Siding Spring Observatory in northern New South Wales, Australia.
dc.descriptionL.T., S.B., A.P., and M.T. are partially supported by the PRIN-INAF 2014 project Transient Universe: unveiling new types of stellar explosions with PESSTO. M.F. is supported by a Royal Society – Science Foundation Ireland University Research Fellowship. K.M. acknowledges support from the STFC through an Ernest Rutherford Fellowship. S.J.S. acknowledges funding from the European Research Council under the European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013)/ERC Grant agreement no. [291222] and STFC grants ST/I001123/1 and ST/L000709/1. L.G. was supported by the US National Science Foundation under Grant AST-1311862. G.P. is supported by Ministry of Economy, Development, and Tourism’s Millennium Science Initiative through grant IC120009, awarded to the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics. C.P.G. acknowledges support from EU/FP7-ERC grant no. [615929]. C.B. gratefully acknowledge the support from the Wenner-Grenn Foundation. F.E.B. acknowledges support from CONICYT-Chile (Basal-CATA PFB-06/2007, FONDECYT Regular 1141218), the Ministry of Economy, Development, and Tourism’s Millennium Science Initiative through grant IC120009, awarded to the Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, MAS. T.-W.C. acknowledges the support through the Sofia Kovalevskaja Award to P. Schady from the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation of Germany. We would like to thank CNTAC for the allocation of REM time through proposals CN2013A-FT-12.
dc.descriptionThe work made use of Swift/UVOT data reduced by P. J. Brown and released in the Swift Optical/Ultraviolet Supernova Archive (SOUSA). SOUSA is supported by NASA’s Astrophysics Data Analysis Program through grant NNX13AF35G. We acknowledge the Weizmann interactive supernova data repository (http://wiserep.weizmann.ac.il).
dc.description.abstractWe present 1 yr of optical and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy of the Type IIP SNe 2013K and 2013am. Both objects are affected by significant extinction, due to their location in dusty regions of their respective host galaxies, ESO 009-10 and NGC 3623 (M65). From the photospheric to nebular phases, these objects display spectra congruent with those of underluminous Type IIP SNe (i.e. the archetypal SNe 1997D or 2005cs), showing low photospheric velocities (~2 × 10 3 km s -1 at 50 d) together with features arising from Ba II that are particularly prominent in faint SNe IIP. The peak V-band magnitudes of SN 2013K (-15.6mag) and SN 2013am (-16.2mag) are fainter than standard-luminosity Type IIP SNe. The ejected nickel masses are 0.012 ± 0.010 and 0.015 ± 0.006 M ⊙ for SN 2013K and SN 2013am, respectively. The physical properties of the progenitors at the time of explosion are derived through hydrodynamical modelling. Fitting the bolometric curves, the expansion velocity and the temperature evolution, we infer total ejected masses of 12 and 11.5 M ⊙ , pre- SN radii of~460 and~360 R ⊙ , and explosion energies of 0.34 foe and 0.40 foe for SN 2013K and SN 2013am. Late time spectra are used to estimate the progenitormasses from the strength of nebular emission lines, which turn out to be consistent with red supergiant progenitors of ~15 M ⊙ . For both SNe, a low-energy explosion of a moderate-mass red supergiant star is therefore the favoured scenario. © 2017 The Authors.es_ES
dc.description.urihttps://academic.oup.com/mnras/article/475/2/1937/4739357
dc.language.isoenes_ES
dc.publisherOxford University Presses_ES
dc.subjectESO 009-10es_ES
dc.subjectGalaxies: individual: M 65es_ES
dc.subjectSN 2013Kes_ES
dc.subjectSupernovae: generales_ES
dc.subjectSupernovae: individual: SN 2013ames_ES
dc.titleSNe 2013K and 2013am: Observed and physical properties of two slow, normal Type IIP eventses_ES
dc.typeArticlees_ES


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